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Month: November 2005

Christmas is coming…

Christmas is coming…

…so you’d best get ready to slaughter thousands of Turkeys!

Many thanks to one of my esteemed colleagues for sending me a link to an auction for a Complete Turkey Processing Facility.

If you’re a vegetarian already, there’s probably no need to click. If, however, you want to have a close look at how all those birds are prepared for your Christmas pleasures, then there you go. You’ll probably want to look at the PDF brochure for all the gory details. Phrases like ‘Foot Cutter’, ‘Neck Skinner’, ‘Liver Washer’, ‘Gizzard Peeler’ and ‘Leg Crusher’ don’t get enough use in common parlance, in my opinion :o)

(Also, don’t those things sound like wrestling moves? “Oooh, he’s got him in a lethal Foot Cutter, and here comes the Gizzard Peeler! He’s out!”)

Turkey – part one

Turkey – part one

Way back in the mists of time, Mary, Harry and I went on a little trip to Turkey, and I think a little blog entry is overdue.

This is Saklikent Gorge. It lay undiscovered until sometime in the 80s when a shepherd’s sheep went astray. The sneaky shepherd told no-one, but rented the land from the government for 25 years, and made his fortune. Eventually the law was changed so that the government could reclaim the land and make some money for itself. If it were in England it would be cordoned off and you’d only be allowed to view it from a distance, but in Turkey you are positively encouraged to brave the rushing, thigh-deep icy water and wander up and down. The water really is cold – it is recently-melted ice, and it really is going some at the point you have to wade through. Luckily I appear to be just over that ‘magic’ height so the water got my legs but nothing more valuable. Judging by the faces on slightly shorter men that inch makes all the difference!



Kayakoy is an amazing place. It was deserted as part of the 1923 population exchange between Turkey and Greece. About 600 houses, 2 churches, 2 schools and many chapels have lain dormant for 82 years, slowly decaying. You can wander around the town to your heart’s content, stumbling over crumbled houses, looking out over the village from the many vantage points. It’s a chilling place as you think about the entire town moving out.